Exercise for Chronic Pelvic Pain

A young woman grimaces with pelvic pain

Many people with chronic pain gradually withdraw from exercise and day-to-day physical activities, such as housework, as a result of their pain. However, they then become more deconditioned, and are likely to have flare-ups of pain more easily.

There is now plenty of good evidence that general exercise is helpful for all types of chronic pain, and chronic pelvic pain is no exception. Exercise produces endorphins, which are one of our bodies’ natural “pain killers”, so can actually help to reduce pain levels. Exercise also has many other health benefits for our heart health and reducing the risk for many chronic diseases.

However exercise needs to be undertaken with some caution, as starting too much exercise too soon can also cause a flare-up. A Women’s Health Physiotherapist can guide you on returning to general exercise in an appropriately paced way, and also help you to progress exercise gradually to avoid flare-ups. Low impact exercise, such as walking or swimming, is often a good way to start.

Along with the benefits of general exercise, many women with chronic pelvic pain will also find some other exercises helpful. This includes gentle stretches for the muscles around the hips and pelvis. As many women with chronic pelvic pain also have overactive pelvic floor muscles, learning how to relax these muscles with pelvic floor muscle down-training exercises will also be very helpful.

On the other hand, women with chronic pelvic pain should also avoid certain activities. Pelvic floor muscle strength training will make overactive pelvic floor muscles and pelvic pain worse. Many women also find exercises that involve holding in their core muscles, including Pilates and high impact activities, can also aggravate their pain. A Women’s Health Physiotherapist can provide guidance on stretches and down-training exercises, as well as help you to modify other exercise appropriately.

There is now plenty of good evidence that general exercise is helpful for all types of chronic pain, and chronic pelvic pain is no exception. Exercise produces endorphins, which are one of our bodies’ natural “pain killers”, so can actually help to reduce pain levels. Exercise also has many other health benefits for our heart health and reducing the risk for many chronic diseases.

However exercise needs to be undertaken with some caution, as starting too much exercise too soon can also cause a flare-up. A Women’s Health Physiotherapist can guide you on returning to general exercise in an appropriately paced way, and also help you to progress exercise gradually to avoid flare-ups. Low impact exercise, such as walking or swimming, is often a good way to start.

Along with the benefits of general exercise, many women with chronic pelvic pain will also find some other exercises helpful. This includes gentle stretches for the muscles around the hips and pelvis. As many women with chronic pelvic pain also have overactive pelvic floor muscles, learning how to relax these muscles with pelvic floor muscle down-training exercises will also be very helpful.

On the other hand, women with chronic pelvic pain should also avoid certain activities. Pelvic floor muscle strength training will make overactive pelvic floor muscles and pelvic pain worse. Many women also find exercises which involve holding in their core muscles, including Pilates and high impact activities, can also aggravate their pain. A Women’s Health Physiotherapist can provide guidance on stretches and down-training exercises, as well as help you to modify other exercise appropriately.

Next Steps

Contact Us for more information on how a Women’s Health Physiotherapist can help you with these problems.

Make A Booking or call us on 8132 0566, or 0404 296 069 to see a Women’s Health Physiotherapist about your condition.

About Us

Jenny Phillips is a Titled Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapist. She offers skilled advice and management for all types of pelvic floor and pre- and post-natal problems.

Life Cycle Physiotherapy also offers exercise classes and 1:1 exercise sessions for women at all stages of life, including pregnancy and postnatal classes.

Follow Us

Get In Touch

Level 1, 18 Dequetteville Tce, Kent Town, South Australia 5067
+61 8 8132 0566
92 Carrington St, Adelaide, SA 5000
+61 404 296 069

Subscribe

Subscribe to our mailing lists for articles, news, and updates about events and classes.